Is History Repeating?

Can Turkey Lead the Islamic World and Still Be a Western Ally?

Erdogan Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The AKP does not aspire to be a model for the Islamic world; it aspires to be its leader — a duty which includes safeguarding the interests of the nearly 20 million Muslims living in Europe. In Erdoğan’s view, it is the EU which must accommodate itself to Turkey, not vice versa. Erdoğan is saying to the West: If you want my help in the Middle East, then we’ll play by my rules.

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Why are U. S. and Russian Warships Heading to Cyprus?

Here’s the headline and summary:

Russia moved warships into the Mediterranean

First time in decades the Russian Pacific Fleet ships have reached the Mediterranean via the Suez Canal. And the U.S. have moved ships into the region.  The situation is getting worse.

What situation is getting worse?

Here’s the article, poorly translated from German, but you can get the basic thrust of the story. Is there a reason this isn’t on the evening news? Are we headed for war? What are we doing in Cyprus? Why is Russia sending warships there, too?

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&eotf=1&u=http://deutsche-wirtschafts-nachrichten.de/2013/05/17/russland-verlegt-kriegsschiffe-ins-mittelmeer/

Why Is the Weather (and Sky) Changing?

For Crying Out Loud

Our men and women of the armed services are crying–crying out for help for hundreds of soldiers a year who are taking their own life from service-induced trauma, and no one in a position of authority is helping solve the problem.

According to the Associate Press, in 2012 members of the armed forces killed themselves in record numbers. Some experts expect the trend to worsen in 2013.  The Pentagon is aware of the problem. In its own internal statistics, the Pentagon projected an 8% increase in soldier suicides in 2012. In fact, the actual increase is double, a 16% increase in suicide among military personnel.

A true life story from Associated Press tells it all:

One such case was Army Spc. Christopher Nguyen, 29, who killed himself in August at an off-post residence he shared with another member of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., according to his sister, Shawna Nguyen.

“He was practically begging for help, and nothing was done,” she said in an interview.

She said he had been diagnosed with an “adjustment disorder” — a problem of coping with the uncertainties of returning home after three deployments in war zones. She believes the Army failed her brother by not doing more to ensure that he received the help he needed before he became suicidal.

“It’s the responsibility of the military to help these men and women,” she said. “They sent them over there (to war); they should be helping them when they come back.”